PERPETUAL RADAR...PR and MORE

"Keeping an Eye on the Ball 24/7 "

Author: Dawn Dinsdale-Hunt (page 1 of 165)

‘REACH: A NEW STRATEGY TO HELP YOU STEP OUTSIDE YOUR COMFORT ZONE…’

‘… RISE TO THE CHALLENGE AND BUILD CONFIDENCE’ part two

by Andy Molinsky
Published by Avery Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780399574023
eBook ISBN: 9780399574030
Copyright (c) 2017 by Andy Molinsky

Buy the Book

 


“As you can probably tell, I have always been both inspired by these sorts of messages and frustrated by them. I love the idea that we all have a comfort zone—a place where we feel capable and at ease—but that stretching outside this comfort zone is critical in many cases for achieving our goals—or, in terms of the picture above—to get where the magic happens. That’s the fascinating part.

The frustrating part is that I’ve always felt a bit hopeless trying to apply this logic to lessons in my own life. And I suspect that others probably have been too. For starters, I’ve always found the diagram with the two circles representing “your comfort zone” and “where the magic happens” to be extraordinarily incomplete. Where, for example, is the bridge between the two circles? In other words, how do you actually get from one place to another? It’s nice to think that it’s as easy as a fish jumping from one bowl to another, but I know from personal experience that this simply is not the case. Stretching outside your comfort zone takes serious effort and work. You need motivation for sure—and I do find many of the messages on the Internet to be quite inspirational. But motivation alone doesn’t seal the deal. What’s truly lacking is a concrete road map about the “how”—how to move from a place of fear, paralysis, and avoidance to the point of actually being willing and able to take that leap and start a more positive cycle of learning and development.

We often feel overwhelmed—sometimes even hopeless—when we have to act outside our comfort zones. But the reality is that we face a set of very predictable and identifiable challenges—and we can overcome these challenges by following the guidelines outlined in this book. This book will explain why it’s so hard to act outside your comfort zone and help you develop the courage and ability to flex your behavior with success. The framework in the book is not one size fits all; rather, it is personalized and customized to the particular challenges that you happen to face in any situation you find yourself.

MY OWN JOURNEY

Probably like many of you, I have been struggling with this issue of behavior flexing throughout my own adult life, sometimes taking a leap and going for it, and other times crafting my life or my job to unfortunately avoid opportunities that could have potentially led to real growth and development. For example, in college, I was afraid of saying anything in class, and therefore ended up choosing mostly lecture-style courses where classroom participation wasn’t an important part of the agenda. I was also afraid of stretching my skills and trying something “more professional” outside of school and during the summers, even though I was certainly curious about the “real” world. As a result, I taught tennis and was a summer camp counselor—both were rewarding experiences, but neither really enabled me to explore the world of business, which interested me and, at the same time, felt unfamiliar and scary. In my first job as a professor, I was quite tentative in faculty meetings—just like in college. I wasn’t sure what to say, or whether what I thought I wanted to say had any merit. I was also pretty intimidated by the senior faculty, worried they would scrutinize my every word. 

And even now, as a senior faculty member at a different school, I feel the struggle of adjusting my behavior in different domains. Public speaking—especially to business audiences—has been a challenge I’ve had to overcome. It’s especially challenging when I have to convince busy executives of the importance of topics like acting outside your comfort zone. I have had to learn to be more direct and authoritative, to project confidence in a way that isn’t necessarily my go-to demeanor. I’ve also had to learn to schmooze and network, when I’d much prefer to meet people one on one over coffee, or even connect via Skype.

I feel like I’m constantly navigating my own personal comfort zone—and from what I hear from others, I know I’m not alone. In fact, as a university professor, I have been studying this topic in one way or another for the past fifteen years. I started this work with a project about organizational change at two distinct types of organizations: a Fortune 500 corporation and a metropolitan teaching hospital. While doing this work, I was struck by the difficulties employees in these organizations experienced during the change process and by how much of that struggle was rooted in having to deviate from intuitive patterns of behavior. In the ensuing years, I became fascinated by this idea of acting outside your comfort zone and studied it in two very different settings.

The first was in the context of having to perform what my research collaborator and I called “necessary evils” at work—situations where people had to cause physical and/or emotional pain and discomfort to others as part of their professional position. We studied managers firing and laying off employees, police officers serving warrants or evicting people from their homes, doctors delivering negative diagnoses to patients or performing painful procedures, and tough-love therapists at addiction facilities humiliating and embarrassing addicts with the goal of rehabilitating them. In each case, the professionals in these settings struggled to perform tasks at work that were necessary in order to achieve the mission of their organization or the responsibilities of their jobs, but that were deeply uncomfortable. And to succeed, they needed to find a way to successfully flex their behavior, ideally in a way that helped them achieve their professional objective but that didn’t make them feel like they were losing themselves in the process.

 


FROM THE BOOK JACKET:

Do you feel comfortable delivering bad news? Do you look forward to speaking in public? Do you enjoy networking? Is it easy for you to speak your mind and be assertive with friends and colleagues? If you answered no to any of these questions, this book can help!

What often sets successful people apart is their willingness to do things most of us fear. Whats more, we have the false notion that successful people like to do these things, when the truth is that successful people have simply found their own way to do them.

According to Andy Molinsky, an expert on behavior in the business world, there are five key challenges underlying our avoidance tendencies: authenticity, competence, resentment, likability, and morality. Does the new behavior youre attempting feel authentic to you? Is it the right thing to do? Answering these questions will help identify the gapin our behavioral style that we can then bridge by using the three Cs: Clarity, Conviction, and Customization. Perhaps most interesting, Molinsky has discovered that many people who confront what they were avoiding come to realize that they actually enjoy it, and can even be good at it.

Short, prescriptive, and based not only on the authors groundbreaking research but on his own quest to get out of his comfort zone, Reach will help you take the thing you are most afraid of doing and make it a proud part of your personal repertoire.


AUTHOR INFO: 

Andy Molinsky is a professor of organizational behavior at Brandeis University’s International Business School, specializing in behavior change and cross-cultural interaction in business settings. He holds a B.A. in international relations, magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa, from Brown University; an M.A. in international business from Columbia University; and an M.A. in psychology and a Ph.D. in organizational behavior from Harvard University. Molinsky regularly writes for the 

Harvard Business Review and was named one of LinkedIn’s Top Voices of 2016.His work has been featured in The EconomistFast CompanyFortuneFinancial TimesThe Boston Globe, NPR, and the Voice of America. His first book, Global Dexterity (Harvard Business Review Press, 2013), received the Axiom Award (Silver Medal) for Best Business Book in International Business & Globalization and has been used widely in organizations around the world, including Boeing, AIG, the U.S. Air Force Academy, and the Clinton Foundation, among others. He speaks regularly to a wide range of professional audiences. 


This week’s selection ‘REACH: A NEW STRATEGY TO HELP YOU STEP OUTSIDE YOUR COMFORT ZONE, RISE TO THE CHALLENGE AND BUILD CONFIDENCE’ by Andy Molinsky appears Monday thru Friday and comes to you courtesy of dearreader.com and BurlingtonPublicLibrary.ca Business Online Book Club.

Buy the Book

 

‘REACH: A NEW STRATEGY TO HELP YOU STEP OUTSIDE YOUR COMFORT ZONE…’

‘… RISE TO THE CHALLENGE AND BUILD CONFIDENCE’ part one

by Andy Molinsky
Published by Avery Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780399574023
eBook ISBN: 9780399574030
Copyright (c) 2017 by Andy Molinsky

Buy the Book


FROM THE BOOK JACKET:

Do you feel comfortable delivering bad news? Do you look forward to speaking in public? Do you enjoy networking? Is it easy for you to speak your mind and be assertive with friends and colleagues? If you answered no to any of these questions, this book can help!

What often sets successful people apart is their willingness to do things most of us fear. Whats more, we have the false notion that successful people like to do these things, when the truth is that successful people have simply found theirown way to do them.

According to Andy Molinsky, an expert on behavior in the business world, there are five key challenges underlying our avoidance tendencies: authenticity, competence, resentment, likability, and morality. Does the new behavior youre attempting feel authentic to you? Is it the right thing to do? Answering these questions will help identify the gap in our behavioral style that we can then bridge by using the three Cs: Clarity, Conviction, and Customization. Perhaps most interesting, Molinsky has discovered that many people who confront what they were avoiding come to realize that they actually enjoy it, and can even be good at it.

Short, prescriptive, and based not only on the authors groundbreaking research but on his own quest to get out of his comfort zone, Reach will help you take the thing you are most afraid of doing and make it a proud part of your personal repertoire.


AUTHOR INFO: 

Andy Molinsky is a professor of organizational behavior at Brandeis University’s International Business School, specializing in behavior change and cross-cultural interaction in business settings. He holds a B.A. in international relations, magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa, from Brown University; an M.A. in international business from Columbia University; and an M.A. in psychology and a Ph.D. in organizational behavior from Harvard University. Molinsky regularly writes for the Harvard Business Review and was named one of LinkedIn’s Top Voices of 2016.His work has been featured in The EconomistFast CompanyFortuneFinancial TimesThe Boston Globe, NPR, and the Voice of America. His first book, Global Dexterity (Harvard Business Review Press, 2013), received the Axiom Award (Silver Medal) for Best Business Book in International Business & Globalization and has been used widely in organizations around the world, including Boeing, AIG, the U.S. Air Force Academy, and the Clinton Foundation, among others. He speaks regularly to a wide range of professional audiences. 


“INTRODUCTION

Lily Chang paced back and forth around her office. She took a bite of a muffin but put it down. She didn’t feel hungry at all, even though she hadn’t eaten all day. She nervously checked her phone. No messages. She then checked her pulse. Sky-high—around 95 or 98 beats a minute. It was a year since Lily had started her Internet company and six months after she had hired her best friend, Julia. And now Lily had to do the unthinkable and actually tell her friend that she no longer had a job. And as Lily continued pacing around the room, thinking of things to say and then immediately rejecting all of them, she thought to herself that she honestly had no idea if she could actually go through with it.

No one likes to move beyond their comfort zone, but as the saying goes, that’s where the magic happens. It’s where we can grow, learn, and develop in a way that expands our horizons beyond what we thought was possible. Also, it’s terrifying. In Lily’s case, she had to fire her best friend. But all of us confront tasks at work that force us outside our comfort zones. It may not be firing a best friend, but it could be giving negative feedback, or promoting ourselves, or speaking up, or networking. The list of uncomfortable but necessary tasks is long—and unfortunately quite challenging. And although these small things seem irksome, no one ever succeeds at a high level or accomplishes substantial goals without learning to confront them.

Take, for example, the case of Neil Kennedy, who, before Facebook even existed, had a Facebook-like website that could have potentially revolutionized the Internet. But Neil was shy and inexperienced, and the idea of walking into a room to pitch his product—and himself—to a group of high-octane investors was overwhelming. In the end, Neil went into avoidance mode, tweaking and perfecting his website for such a long time that Facebook itself eventually launched and his fledgling ideas had become obsolete. He was so afraid of acting outside his comfort zone that he never capitalized on a potentially life-changing opportunity.

A different but equally challenging case comes from Annie Jones, a thirty-four-year- old account manager at a financial firm whose challenge was finding a way to be assertive and direct with a male portfolio manager who would undermine her in client meetings—when her natural tendency was to smooth things over and avoid conflict. Annie tried to “hint” at her frustration, or make a snide remark here or there under her breath. But it didn’t go anywhere, and the manager’s bad behavior just continued.

In an ideal world, no one would have to reach beyond their comfort zone to succeed at work, and all the tasks and responsibilities we need to perform would fit perfectly with our personalities. Annie would have the confidence and assertiveness to easily confront her colleagues; Neil would have the bravado to present his ideas; and Lily would have the courage, confidence, and resolve to deliver her message.

But unfortunately, this is not usually the case. Conflict-avoidant managers often need to embrace conflict—or at least learn to tolerate it. Timid entrepreneurs need to be able to pitch and promote themselves and their ideas…introverts need to network …self-conscious executives need to deliver speeches…and people
pleasers need to deliver bad news. You get the idea.

As we grow and learn and advance in our jobs and in our careers, we’re constantly faced with situations where we need to adapt and adjust our behavior. It’s simply a reality of the world we work in today. And without the skill—and courage—to take the leap, we can miss out on important opportunities for advancement. Also, like Lily, we can fail to perform the tasks that are critical for advancing our businesses and our careers. And that’s where this book comes in. The goal of this book is to give you the tips and tools—not to mention the courage—to take that leap, reach outside your comfort zone, and do it in a way that is both effective and authentic, meeting the expectations you need to achieve and without losing yourself in the process.

Chances are, if you’ve ever been interested in the topic of comfort zones—and are comfortable with the search function on Google—you’ve come across something like what you see above.

And if you delve further into the world of comfort zones on Google (as I have!), you’ll find many other pictures and diagrams of similar ilk. You have brazen goldfish taking the leap and jumping from one fishbowl to another. You have people walking on tightropes, parachuting, jumping off cliffs—telling you that “everything you’ve always wanted is one step beyond your comfort zone” and that “you’re only confined by the walls you build for yourself.” And then, of course, there are the stories—successful and confident people who had the courage to go for it, and take a leap, and are now spokespeople for Comfort Zone, Inc., imploring us to do the same: Take the leap! Go for it! The only thing to fear is fear itself!””


This week’s selection ‘REACH: A NEW STRATEGY TO HELP YOU STEP OUTSIDE YOUR COMFORT ZONE, RISE TO THE CHALLENGE AND BUILD CONFIDENCE’ by Andy Molinsky appears Monday thru Friday and comes to you courtesy of dearreader.com and BurlingtonPublicLibrary.ca Business Online Book Club.

Buy the Book

 

‘YOU’VE GOT 8 SECONDS: COMMUNICATION SECRETS…’

 ‘…FOR A DISTRACTED WORLD’ part five

by Paul Hellman
Published by Amacom
ISBN: 9780814438305
eBook ISBN: 9780814438312
Copyright (c) 2017 by Paul Hellman

Buy the Book


“SAY MORE

You may have the opposite problem.

“I’ve gotten feedback,” a manager told me, “to speak up more at meetings.”

“What stops you?” I asked him.

“Others in the room—they’ve got more experience and expertise. So I think, Why would they listen to me?

Ever feel like that? Who hasn’t.

It’s an editing problem, really. You’re at a meeting, you have a thought, but before you can say “hello,” you edit yourself: “Is that really worth sharing?”

Over the years, as an author, I’ve worked with editors at several publishing houses. Editors range from very encouraging to very critical.

One day, I heard about an editor who was beloved for his glowing comments. “Brilliant!” he’d tell an author. “I just love your whole book.”

Meanwhile, my editor at the time had just sent back my manuscript. Almost every page was marked up in red: “You lost me here.” “Is this section really necessary?” “This whole chapter needs a lot of work.”

So editors run the gamut. Let’s talk about your editor, the one inside your head who determines what you say and what you don’t, the “border guard on the line between thought and speech.”

If your inner editor is too fierce, it’s inhibiting. Try this:

Practice speaking nonstop for 60 seconds on a random topic. Do this alone, perhaps in your car going to work.

You don’t need to stay on the topic, just begin there. Any topic will do, for example, your To Do list, a current career dilemma, or your beliefs about spaghetti sauce.

Just voice your thoughts, as they occur—forget about being coherent—even if your only thought is that you have no beliefs, really, about spaghetti sauce.

The goal: loosen your editor, spark your spontaneity. You’ll never change your personality—why would you want to?—just your range.

MORE OR LESS? GIVE APPROPRIATE DETAIL 

What’s appropriate detail? This is the key question to ask yourself, again and again.

Answer: depends on your audience.

Consider the first line of Ernest Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea. Hemingway was famous for simple words and short sentences:

“He was an old man who fished alone…and he had gone eighty-four  days now without taking a fish.”

If you’re a fisherman speaking to a fishing audience, they’ll want more detail; non-fishers, less. Similarly, technical audiences often appreciate more detail; nontechnical audiences, less.

Here’s what The Old Man and the Sea looks like, by the way, as a PowerPoint slide:

Old Man Catches Big Fish

Sharks come

They eat the fish

Nothing left, except backbone

Hemingway chose to write a novel, not a Power Point slide.

Being concise doesn’t mean speaking 24/7 in bullet points. Other-wise, you’ll sound like a prisoner of war, or a terse teenager who thinks he’s a prisoner of war.

So be flexible. And observe your audience. They’ll give you clues about appropriate detail. When you’re talking to someone and she starts tapping a pencil, or a foot, or the side of your head, that’s a clue.

HOW MUCH TO SELF-DISCLOSE? STRESS-TEST A RISKY DISCLOSURE

As we circled the Toronto airport, the pilot made a disturbing announcement.

He had to say something; we’d just attempted to land, then shot back up. So the passengers definitely needed an explanation, even if the pilot had to make one up.

“The problem,” he said, in a somber voice, “is fog.” That sounded like a perfectly good reason to me; I wish he’d left it there.

But then he added, “Several other planes are about to land. Let’s see how that goes.”

This excerpt ends on page 10 of the paperback edition.


FROM THE BOOK JACKET: 

You made a great point–but did anybody hear it?

Every day at work, people do three things: talk, listen, and pretend to listen. That’s not surprising–the average attention span has dropped to 8 seconds. To get heard, says high-stakes communications expert Paul Hellman, you need to focus your message, be slightly different, and deliver with finesse.

Through fast, fun, actionable tips, You’ve Got 8 Seconds explains what works and what doesn’t, what’s forgettable and what sticks. With stories, scripts, and examples of good and bad messages, the book reveals three main strategies:

FOCUS: Design a strong message–then say it in seconds.

VARIETY: Make routine information come alive.

PRESENCE: Convey confidence and command attention.

You’ll discover practical techniques, including the Fast-Focus Method(TM) that the author uses with leadership teams; how to stand out in the first seconds of a presentation; and 10 actions that spell executive presence.

Whether pitching a project, giving a speech, selling a product, or just writing your next email, with You’ve Got 8 Seconds you’ll get heard, get remembered, and get results. 

 


ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Paul Hellman has worked with thousands of executives & professionals at leading organizations for over 25 years. His columns and advice have appeared in The New York TimesWall Street JournalWashington Post, as well as on public radio’s Marketplace, and CNN’s Business Unusual. Paul has An MBA from MIT’s Sloan School of Management.

This week’s selection ‘YOU’VE GOT 8 SECONDS: COMMUNICATION SECRETS FOR A DISTRACTED WORLD’ by Paul Hellman appears Monday thru Friday and comes to you courtesy of dearreader.com and BurlingtonPublicLibrary.ca Business Online Book Club.

Buy the Book

 

‘YOU’VE GOT 8 SECONDS: COMMUNICATION SECRETS…’

‘…. FOR A DISTRACTED WORLD’ part four

by Paul Hellman
Published by Amacom
ISBN: 9780814438305
eBook ISBN: 9780814438312
Copyright (c) 2017 by Paul Hellman

Buy the Book


“Sometimes, when providing information, you and I fall in love with the details, as if they were our children. We want everyone to know all about them.

But this candidate’s main message was clear, without the details: “Look, if I can raise six kids, I can obviously run a country.”

Meanwhile, at a 2016 Republican debate, one of the candidates, a current senator, said he’d eliminate five federal agencies. Then he proceeded to name each one.

Same trap. Same result.

He listed the Commerce Department twice, as if to say, “You can’t just get rid of the Commerce Department once. Any idiot can do that. No, I’m going to get rid of it, and then I’m going to get rid of it again . . .”

If the details are too much for you, the speaker, to remember, your listeners don’t stand a chance.

TELL THEM WHAT YOU’RE NOT GOING TO TELL THEM 

There’s mystery in what people don’t say. Let’s use that to our advantage.

When you ask someone, “How are you?” you get the mysterious answer, “Fine.”

No one says, “Well, my spouse just ran off with the plumber, and ever since she left, I’ve been despondent. Also, the upstairs sink hasn’t been draining properly.”

But in other conversations, the border between what to disclose vs. what not to, gets murky.

I recently patrolled that border with a group of research scientists, while working on their upcoming presentations. Every presentation lives, or dies, at that border.

We all know what it’s like to be in the audience. I often advise clients to imagine an unpleasant dental procedure.

Suppose your presentation is 10 minutes. That’s a 10-minute procedure. And if you’re one of eight people presenting that day, you’d need to multiply those 10 minutes by eight dentists.

That’s a long time.

The Gettysburg Address, as you’ve probably heard at least 272 times, was only 272 words—two minutes. You wouldn’t need a dentist for that, just a hygienist, cleaning and flossing at breakneck speed.

Wouldn’t you rather your audience think That meeting was way too short, I wish there’d been another 37 PowerPoint slides! than the opposite?

Then consider, there are different ways to “tell.”

You already know the value of a preview (tell them what you’re going to tell them) and a review (tell them what you’ve told them), although it’s shocking how seldom we use these tools.

Here’s something different: Tell them what you’re NOT going to tell them.

A research scientist could say, “I’m not going to tell you about each of the 278 validation studies we ran. Let’s just say it was complicated.” Message: We didn’t just pull this data out of a hat.

When it comes to either information or dentistry, less is more.

TO SAY LESS, MEASURE

Recently, I got a sports watch as a gift. The watch measures all sorts of things when you’re out running, or walking, or getting carried away to the nearest hospital.

Sometimes, before it displays any stats, the watch adds a comment. But not always.

Suppose on Sunday, I walk out to the driveway and pick up the newspaper. No comment. Not even, “We can’t believe you’re up so early! Way to go!

And even when it adds a comment, like after a four or five-mile workout, the watch seems unimpressed. “Nice effort,” is all it says. I suspect it’s being sarcastic.

But what I’ve noticed, since I’ve been measuring things, is that my workouts keep getting longer and longer. The act of measuring is not neutral; it changes behavior.

If you want to be more concise, let’s measure that. Here’s a possible workout:

In one-to-one conversations, talk less than the other person. Instead of rambling on and on, ask at least one thought-provoking question per conversation.

In meetings, speak in 30-60 second bites. Provide the headline news first, with details later, and only give details if asked. You’ll be surprised by how much you can say in 30 seconds.

When presenting, slim down to 10 PowerPoint slides or less. And occasionally, lose the entire deck (PowerPoint tips, page 102). 

You get the point. I’d like to say more but, according to my watch, I’ve got to run.

***** TABLE OF CONTENTS *****

SHOULD YOU READ THIS BOOK? WHAT IF YOU DON’T HAVE TIME?

PART I

Capture Attention with FOCUS

  1. Say Less

  2. The Fast-Focus Method

  3. Three More Ways to Focus

  4. Watch Your Words—and Your Emails

PART II

Capture Attention with VARIETY

  1. Be Slightly Different

  2. The Easiest Way to Explain Anything

  3. Stories: The 2.5 Step Method

  4. Vary from Announce to Discuss

  5. Questions: How to Ask the Best and Answer the Worst

  6. Presentation Tricks

PART III

Capture Attention with PRESENCE

  1. Act As If

  2. Ten Actions to Increase Your Presence: Assess Yourself

  3. Image: Communicate that You Look and Sound the Part

  4. Drive: Communicate that You Get Results

  5. Temperament: Communicate that You’ve Got the Right Disposition”


FROM THE BOOK JACKET: 

You made a great point–but did anybody hear it?

Every day at work, people do three things: talk, listen, and pretend to listen. That’s not surprising–the average attention span has dropped to 8 seconds. To get heard, says high-stakes communications expert Paul Hellman, you need to focus your message, be slightly different, and deliver with finesse.

Through fast, fun, actionable tips, You’ve Got 8 Seconds explains what works and what doesn’t, what’s forgettable and what sticks. With stories, scripts, and examples of good and bad messages, the book reveals three main strategies:

FOCUS: Design a strong message–then say it in seconds.

VARIETY: Make routine information come alive.

PRESENCE: Convey confidence and command attention.

You’ll discover practical techniques, including the Fast-Focus Method(TM) that the author uses with leadership teams; how to stand out in the first seconds of a presentation; and 10 actions that spell executive presence.

Whether pitching a project, giving a speech, selling a product, or just writing your next email, with You’ve Got 8 Seconds you’ll get heard, get remembered, and get results. 

 


ABOUT THE AUTHOR: 

Paul Hellman has worked with thousands of executives & professionals at leading organizations for over 25 years. His columns and advice have appeared in The New York TimesWall Street JournalWashington Post, as well as on public radio’s Marketplace, and CNN’s Business Unusual. Paul has An MBA from MIT’s Sloan School of Management.

 

This week’s selection ‘YOU’VE GOT 8 SECONDS: COMMUNICATION SECRETS FOR A DISTRACTED WORLD’ by Paul Hellman appears Monday thru Friday and comes to you courtesy of dearreader.com and BurlingtonPublicLibrary.ca Business Online Book Club.

Buy the Book

 

‘YOU’VE GOT 8 SECONDS: COMMUNICATION SECRETS…’

‘… FOR A DISTRACTED WORLD’ part three

by Paul Hellman
Published by Amacom
ISBN: 9780814438305
eBook ISBN: 9780814438312
Copyright (c) 2017 by Paul Hellman

Buy the Book


“PART ONE 

Capture Attention with FOCUS

“If you have an important point to make, don’t try to be subtle or clever…Hit the point once. Then come back and hit it again. Then hit it a third time—a tremendous whack!”—WINSTON CHURCHILL

Roadmap for Part I, Chapters 1-4: 

How do you design a message that gets heard, gets remembered, and gets results?

One solution: say less. For example, tell them what you’re ‘not’ going to tell them. Saying less requires practice, and we’ll discuss some easy drills (chapter 1).

‘Fast-focus'(TM) (chapter 2) is the methodology I use with leadership teams and individual executives to design critical messages. We’ll go through it, step-by-step.

Then we’ll look at designing messages for special situations, such as how to talk about your accomplishments without bragging, and how to give difficult feedback without getting pushback (chapter 3).

Words are the raw materials of a message, so we’ll end this section with how to make your words sparkle, whether speaking or writing, even if you have writer’s block (chapter 4).

CHAPTER ONE

SAY LESS

In Maine we have a saying that there’s no point in speaking unless you can improve on silence.“—EDMUND MUSKIE, former U.S. Senator and Secretary of State

DON’T OVER-SALT

Detail is like salt. You can always add more. (If others want more, they’ll ask questions.) But once in, you can’t take it out.

Consider what your audience wants to know. But also, and every bit as important, what they don’t want to know—because they’ve got no time, no interest, they’re preoccupied with 10,000 other things, and they’d gladly pay you a boatload of money if you simply didn’t tell them.

“Describe yourself,” one CEO asks job applicants, “in three words or less.”

What would you say? Probably not “wordy and repetitive.”

But how focused are you?

“You seem to have 29 ideas at once,” an exec told one of his managers. “And I feel like I’m hearing them all, right this minute.”

Ever gotten feedback like that?

I work with several companies where executives, after taking a communication assessment, will gladly tell you their preferred styles. Each style has its own color.

Let’s say you walk into an office and see the color red. That means, in essence, “Get to the point. Then get out.”

But most execs aren’t that direct.

Your boss probably hasn’t asked you to say it in three words or less, or given you feedback about your 29 ideas, or flashed the color red in your face.

Maybe she hasn’t said a thing about valuing conciseness.

Assume it.

AVOID MENTIONING ALL YOUR CHILDREN—DITTO FOR LISTS LONGER THAN THREE ITEMS.

Imagine standing in front of a huge televised audience, with only a minute to introduce yourself. The stakes are enormous.

You’re running for U.S. President.

What do you say, and what do you leave out? That’s a problem that you and I, on a smaller stage, face daily.

At a 2016 Democratic debate, one of the candidates, a former U.S. senator, told us that he had five daughters and one son. Fine.

Then he proceeded to name each one, plus tell us their occupations.

But after the first two daughters, he paused, as if he couldn’t remember a single thing about daughter #3.

Now I’ve only got two children. But clearly, as you have more and more kids, at some point—I don’t know the exact number—your mind turns completely to mush.

Then the candidate recovered: “Julia! Massage therapist!” (Luckily, daughters #4 and #5 were both in school, so they were quickly dispensed with.)

But here’s the question, and it’s the same one your audience has: why do we need all this info?”


FROM THE BOOK JACKET: 

You made a great point–but did anybody hear it?

Every day at work, people do three things: talk, listen, and pretend to listen. That’s not surprising–the average attention span has dropped to 8 seconds. To get heard, says high-stakes communications expert Paul Hellman, you need to focus your message, be slightly different, and deliver with finesse.

Through fast, fun, actionable tips, You’ve Got 8 Seconds explains what works and what doesn’t, what’s forgettable and what sticks. With stories, scripts, and examples of good and bad messages, the book reveals three main strategies:

FOCUS: Design a strong message–then say it in seconds.

VARIETY: Make routine information come alive.

PRESENCE: Convey confidence and command attention.

You’ll discover practical techniques, including the Fast-Focus Method(TM) that the author uses with leadership teams; how to stand out in the first seconds of a presentation; and 10 actions that spell executive presence.

Whether pitching a project, giving a speech, selling a product, or just writing your next email, with You’ve Got 8 Seconds you’ll get heard, get remembered, and get results. 

 


ABOUT THE AUTHOR: 

Paul Hellman has worked with thousands of executives & professionals at leading organizations for over 25 years. His columns and advice have appeared in The New York TimesWall Street JournalWashington Post, as well as on public radio’s Marketplace, and CNN’s Business Unusual. Paul has An MBA from MIT’s Sloan School of Management.


This week’s selection ‘YOU’VE GOT 8 SECONDS: COMMUNICATION SECRETS FOR A DISTRACTED WORLD’ by Paul Hellman appears Monday thru Friday and comes to you courtesy of dearreader.com and BurlingtonPublicLibrary.ca Business Online Book Club.

Buy the Book

 

Older posts