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‘YOU’VE GOT 8 SECONDS: COMMUNICATION SECRETS …’

‘…FOR A DISTRACTED WORLD’ part two

by Paul Hellman
Published by Amacom
ISBN: 9780814438305
eBook ISBN: 9780814438312
Copyright (c) 2017 by Paul Hellman

Buy the Book


Pretending to Listen?

At a meeting, while others talk, your inner experience may look like this:

  1. Why does everyone at this meeting, you wonder, have such enormous water bottles? How long is this meeting going to last?

  1. Chocolate donuts! The ones on the table look tasty. But wait, you’re on a diet. Oh, who cares?

  1. Focus, focus, focus. Good.

  1. Right now, you’re extremely focused on the word ‘focus’.

  1. Oh look, a tweet: “A wealth of information creates a poverty of attention, according to Herbert Simon.”

  1. Who’s Herbert Simon?

  1. You’ve heard rumors the company is about to be reorganized, or downsized, or sold, or something. How will that affect you?

  1. Time for another donut.

  1. Why are you even at this meeting? And who’s that person over there? Is that Herbert Simon? 

  1. You just realized something bad, there are 79 slides left. Is it too late, you wonder, to go to clown college? 

 

p.s. Herbert Simon was a Nobel Prize-winning economist, and one of the first to talk about the attention economy.

HOW THIS BOOK WORKS

3 Key Strategies, with 100 Tactics, Based on 25+ Years of Experience

I work with leaders at global companies. My focus? How to excel in high-stakes communications. For example:

Executives at a biotech company need to explain the company strategy to thousands of employees. If the employees don’t get it, the strategy won’t work.

Leaders at a consumer products company need to make a dynamic presentation to senior executives about the results of a complex project. The project took a year. The audience wonders, was it worth it?

Analysts at a mutual fund company need to tell a roomful of colleagues and executives why to buy a specific bond. Time to talk: one to two minutes.

The challenge is always the same: how to get heard, get remembered, and get results. I’ve developed three strategies. They work.

  1. Focus
  2. Variety
  3. Presence 

Focus doesn’t just mean to say less, but also to design a compelling message. I’ll show you several methods, including ‘fast-focus'(TM), which I use with leadership teams and individual executives to make their messages stick.

Variety means to be’ slightly’ different. With variety, you’ll make routine info come alive, you’ll know when to shift gears’—’from ‘announce’ to ‘discuss’—and engage others with smart questions. If you’re giving a presentation, you’ll stand out in the first few seconds.

Presence matters because there are certain people you listen to just because of their presence, and others you tune out. But what is presence? We’ll look at 10 actions that you can use right away to boost your reputation.

The book illustrates these strategies with fast, fun, actionable tactics. Each tactic is self-contained, so it’s easy to skip around. And there’s a headline on top, so you know the point right away.

Let’s get going.“


FROM THE BOOK JACKET: 

You made a great point–but did anybody hear it?

Every day at work, people do three things: talk, listen, and pretend to listen. That’s not surprising–the average attention span has dropped to 8 seconds. To get heard, says high-stakes communications expert Paul Hellman, you need to focus your message, be slightly different, and deliver with finesse.

Through fast, fun, actionable tips, You’ve Got 8 Seconds explains what works and what doesn’t, what’s forgettable and what sticks. With stories, scripts, and examples of good and bad messages, the book reveals three main strategies:

FOCUS: Design a strong message–then say it in seconds.

VARIETY: Make routine information come alive.

PRESENCE: Convey confidence and command attention.

You’ll discover practical techniques, including the Fast-Focus Method(TM) that the author uses with leadership teams; how to stand out in the first seconds of a presentation; and 10 actions that spell executive presence.

Whether pitching a project, giving a speech, selling a product, or just writing your next email, with You’ve Got 8 Seconds you’ll get heard, get remembered, and get results. 

 


ABOUT THE AUTHOR: 

Paul Hellman has worked with thousands of executives & professionals at leading organizations for over 25 years. His columns and advice have appeared in The New York TimesWall Street JournalWashington Post, as well as on public radio’s Marketplace, and CNN’s Business Unusual. Paul has An MBA from MIT’s Sloan School of Management.


This week’s selection ‘YOU’VE GOT 8 SECONDS: COMMUNICATION SECRETS FOR A DISTRACTED WORLD’ by Paul Hellman appears Monday thru Friday and comes to you courtesy of dearreader.com and BurlingtonPublicLibrary.ca Business Online Book Club.

Buy the Book

 

‘YOU’VE GOT 8 SECONDS: COMMUNICATION SECRETS…’

 ‘…FOR A DISTRACTED WORLD’ part one

by Paul Hellman
Published by Amacom
ISBN: 9780814438305
eBook ISBN: 9780814438312
Copyright (c) 2017 by Paul Hellman

Buy the Book


FROM THE BOOK JACKET: 

You made a great point–but did anybody hear it?

Every day at work, people do three things: talk, listen, and pretend to listen. That’s not surprising–the average attention span has dropped to 8 seconds. To get heard, says high-stakes communications expert Paul Hellman, you need to focus your message, be slightly different, and deliver with finesse.

Through fast, fun, actionable tips, You’ve Got 8 Seconds explains what works and what doesn’t, what’s forgettable and what sticks. With stories, scripts, and examples of good and bad messages, the book reveals three main strategies:

FOCUS: Design a strong message–then say it in seconds.

VARIETY: Make routine information come alive.

PRESENCE: Convey confidence and command attention.

You’ll discover practical techniques, including the Fast-Focus Method(TM) that the author uses with leadership teams; how to stand out in the first seconds of a presentation; and 10 actions that spell executive presence.

Whether pitching a project, giving a speech, selling a product, or just writing your next email, with You’ve Got 8 Seconds you’ll get heard, get remembered, and get results. 

 


ABOUT THE AUTHOR: 

Paul Hellman has worked with thousands of executives & professionals at leading organizations for over 25 years. His columns and advice have appeared in The New York TimesWall Street JournalWashington Post, as well as on public radio’s Marketplace, and CNN’s Business Unusual. Paul has An MBA from MIT’s Sloan School of Management.

“SHOULD YOU READ THIS BOOK? WHAT IF YOU DON’T HAVE TIME? 

I tend to make up my mind about people within thirty seconds of meeting them.“—RICHARD BRANSON, founder of Virgin Group

WARNING: OTHERS ARE MAKING SPLIT-SECOND DECISIONS ABOUT YOU—RIGHT NOW 

They’re deciding whether or not to listen to you, or read your emails, or, in general, give you the time of day.

“Are you the speaker?” people sometimes ask me before a meeting.

“Yes,” I say. “Or at least I’m going to pretend to be.”

But the truth is, every person in that room is on stage, because you and I present ourselves every day. And even if you’re working at home, the moment you get on the phone and say “hello,” people will infer all sorts of things about you—your intelligence, your attitude—just by your voice.

Same thing with your emails.

The point is, small moments aren’t so small.

Back to our meeting. Suppose it begins with self-introductions. A small moment? Maybe not.

When it’s your turn, you say:

  1. “I’m Harriet.” But you speak softly, as if you were wanted by the FBI and you suspect that half the room is working undercover. 

Your volume speaks volumes. Speak up, send the message that your message is IMPORTANT. 

  1. “I’m Harriet.” But while speaking, you fidget with your hair, or your jewelry, or you touch your face—these are known as grooming gestures. Not recommended, although preferable to fidgeting with other people’s hair or faces.

 

  1. “I’m Harriet???” You make routine assertions sound like questions by ending every sentence on a higher note. As if you believe that, in this universe, nothing is certain and you just discovered, much to your surprise, that you are, in fact, Harriett. Or at least you ‘could be’ Harriet. The whole thing is bewildering… 

The premise of this book is that people’s attention spans are ridiculously short, that sometimes all you get is a moment, and that these moments count.

Let’s seize them.

NO TIME? 

Let’s talk about your time. In the next 24 hours, everyone in your organization—in every organization—will do one of three things:

  1. Talk
  2. Listen
  3. Pretend to listen 

You definitely don’t have time. No one does, it’s the information age, which means you’re flooded with meetings, emails, and breaking news, every second of every day.

But consider: your colleagues and clients don’t have time either. For sheer survival, they’ll screen out anything that sounds like noise.

Let’s make sure that ‘you’ get heard.

Back to the book: As you’ll see on page xxi (How This Book Works), you don’t ‘necessarily’ have to read it in the traditional start-to-finish way.

You need something fast. You’ve got 8 seconds.

This week’s selection ‘YOU’VE GOT 8 SECONDS: COMMUNICATION SECRETS FOR A DISTRACTED WORLD’ by Paul Hellman appears Monday thru Friday and comes to you courtesy of dearreader.com and BurlingtonPublicLibrary.ca Business Online Book Club.

Buy the Book

‘THE BOOMERANG PRINCIPLE: Inspiring Lifetime Loyalty…’

 ‘…From Your Employees’ part five

by Lee Caraher
Published by Bibliomotion, Inc.
ISBN: 9781629561684
eBook ISBN: 9781351816571
Copyright (c) 2017 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

Buy the Book


“”My friends and I feel that we’re ‘behind.’ Most of us didn’t get our first ‘real jobs’ until three or four years after college.” —Sara, a twenty-nine-year-old retail executive from St. Louis

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average worker today stays at each job for 4.6 years. The longitudinal view on these numbers is, of course, drastically interrupted by the 8.8 million people who lost their jobs between 2008 and 2010. The reality is the reality, and we have to deal with what is instead of what we wish were true if we’re going to focus on building sustainable businesses staffed by people who know they have to be their own best advocates.

The breakdown among gender, generation, and sector is extremely revealing. In January 2014, the median employee tenure for men was 4.7 years, while women had a slightly shorter tenure of 4.5 years. Among men, 30 percent had ten years or more with their current employer, while 28 percent of women had the same longevity. For Boomer workers fifty-five to sixty-four years old, 10.4 years was the median tenure. Among older Boomers, those sixty to sixty-four years of age, 58 percent were employed for at least ten years, compared with only 12 percent for older Millennials ages thirty to thirty-four. Millennials in the twenty-five to thirty-four age group had a three-year tenure median in 2014. And the public sector had nearly double the tenure longevity, at 7.8 years, as the private sector, 4.1 years. Interestingly, 75 percent of government workers were over thirty-five years old, while 60 percent of commercial business workers were over thirty-five years old. (The implications—positive and negative—of the large difference between private and government tenure deserve a closer look, but that’s a different book.)

A Long Time Coming

The shift in “loyalty” among workers has been building for many years. Much like the proverbial frog in water over a flame, we are just waking up to the fact that the water is at a high simmer today, and if we want a chance for a more positive understanding, we need to act now. We need to jump out of the hot water, or we will find ourselves and our businesses increasingly irrelevant—and not at an incremental rate, but at an exponential one.

Older people I interviewed, those fifty-five and older, talked about workplace loyalty as “normal” for them. They believed that if they worked hard and stayed at their companies, they would be “taken care of” with retirement plans and health insurance.

As executive coach and leadership expert Ray Williams explained in ‘Psychology Today’, “In the work world where employees were lifetime workers and employers took care of them, that concept of loyalty made sense. However, today’s work world is vastly different: lifetime employment doesn’t exist, and employers, including governments, have reneged on their promises.”

Employees are driving the shift in loyalty because they know that they can’t count on one company—any company—to provide for them. While Boomer bosses may lament the “fall of loyalty,” they too know that they can’t count on the company to stay loyal to them; the last ten years of labor statistics have proven this fact over and over again.

In response to a blog post by popular serial entrepreneur and career guru Penelope Trunk before the 2008 meltdown, one commenter, Ken, noted, “Attitudes about company and employee loyalties are definitely changing. My own father worked thirty-five years for one company. I followed his lead and worked twenty-five years for one company but they went through a corporate merger and eliminated my department. So I tried again with another company and stayed ten years. This second company bought out a competitor and eliminated the group I worked in. I am now working for a third company but feel NO loyalty to this company and doubt that I ever will. I followed my father’s work ethic but I tell my daughter to be cautious about becoming too loyal to any one workplace.”

This shift really started in the 1980s, when companies started laying off vast numbers of employees in order to achieve better margins and investor returns. Healthy businesses were driving profit, and they started “rightsizing” their organizations to deliver payoffs to Wall Street and increase shareholder value. As Adam Cobb, a Wharton management professor explains, companies that announced staff layoffs would say, “We are doing this in the long- term interest of our shareholders.” Indeed, the 1980s saw the beginning of the trend to push the cost of long-held sacrosanct benefits such as pensions and health care to their employees; workers went from defined benefit plans to 401(k)s, and they were expected to assume larger and larger copays while employers paid a smaller share of healthcare premiums.

Another commenter on Trunk’s blog posted: “Please, employees aren’t loyal because they know their employers can—and will—lay them off at the drop of a hat…entirely due to forces completely outside of the employee’s control. If employers want more loyalty, they shouldn’t be slaves to the next quarterly earnings report from Wall Street.” Remember, this comment was posted ‘before’ the economic meltdown of 20082009. And this sentiment has only increased among workers since that time.

Pressure from investors for quarterly returns started a snowball of short-term employment actions that broke the implied contracts between companies and their workers. No longer was it good enough to work hard and be rewarded for a job well done. The norm is now work hard and deliver quarterly profit goals or perish. This trend in publicly traded companies has damaged the long game for total business return.

In one survey of corporate executives of publicly traded companies, none of the participants said that they would invest in a five to ten-year plan guaranteed to increase profitability if it meant “a penny off of their share price.” The reason, according to one CEO? Because “the market would kill me. Activist shareholders would kill me,” and then the company would have to spend enormous time and energy “fending off this attack.” Clearly, today’s corporate interest for publicly held companies is not in the long term, and therefore, they cannot, by definition, prioritize their employees in the equation.

This excerpt ends on page 8 of the hardcover edition.


FROM THE BOOK JACKET:

It is rare today for employees to stay with one organization for the long tenures that were the norm before the Great Recession. In fact, “job hopping” is the new norm, especially for Millennials. In The Boomerang Principle, companies learn how to leverage this fact rather than fear it. By engendering a lifetime of loyalty from former employees, leaders can see them “return” in the form of customers, partners, clients, advocates, contractors, and even returning employees.

Author Lee Caraher has built several companies and managed many Millennials along the way. In her first book, Millennials & Management, she shared her wisdom on how to get an intergenerational workforce to contribute to the larger goals of the organization. In this follow-up book, she shifts the emphasis to creating valuable, long-lasting relationships with your employees to ensure they remain your biggest fans, even if they leave the company.

The Boomerang Principle is a pragmatic answer to the outdated corporate mindset around employee turnover. Instead, it shifts the focus to creating lifetime loyalty from your alumni who will bring back business again and again.


ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Lee McEnany Caraher is the founder and CEO of Double Forte, a national public relations and digital media agency, based in San Francisco, that works with beloved consumer, technology, and wine brands. A sought-after communication strategist, Lee is known for her practical solutions to big problems. Her first book, Millennials & Management: The Essential Guide to Making It Work at Work, was informed by her work helping organizations around the country create positive intergenerational workplaces.

Lee is active in her community, and sits on the board of directors or trustees of KQED Public Media, San Francisco’s Grace Cathedral, and Menlo College. A graduate of Carleton College, Lee has a degree in medieval history which she finds useful every day. She lives on the San Francisco Peninsula with her husband, their sons, and Al, their blind cat.


This week’s selection ‘THE BOOMERANG PRINCIPLE’ by Lee Caraher appears Monday thru Friday and comes to you courtesy of dearreader.com and BurlingtonPublicLibrary.ca Business Online Book Club.

Buy the Book

‘THE BOOMERANG PRINCIPLE: Inspiring Lifetime Loyalty…’

‘…From Your Employees’ part four

by Lee Caraher
Published by Bibliomotion, Inc.
ISBN: 9781629561684
eBook ISBN: 9781351816571
Copyright (c) 2017 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

Buy the Book


“Job-hopping isn’t new…

… we just haven’t learned how to deal with it efficiently and positively.

Job-hopping isn’t new to most Boomers or Gen Xers. We’ve conveniently forgotten the late 1990s, when many Gen Xers were entering a hot job market. At that time, as the dot-com bubble economy seemed to double in size every week, the common refrain was “if you’ve got a pulse you’ve got a job,” and as soon as graduates got jobs, they quickly got recruited to other ones. Then, the numbers were in the Gen Xers’ favor; the economy was expanding just as the smallest generation, Generation X’s 46 million to the Boomers’ 78 million, was graduating from college. There just weren’t enough young people to fill the ranks of companies in almost every sector.

The job-hopping bonanza of the late 90s was short lived, however. The Gen X workforce has been struck twice at critical career junctures by illtimed economic events that have greatly impacted their career trajectories.

When the dot-com bubble burst in 2000, the impact on the economies in tech-heavy regions around the country, including the San Francisco Bay Area, Seattle, New York, and Boston, was negative and profound. Then, the aftermath of 9/11 in 2001 created further economic compression in many other sectors across the country. In the San Francisco Bay Area alone, more than eighty thousand professionals left the region to find work in other states; there simply wasn’t enough work. Gen Xers (who were between twenty-two and thirty-six in 2001) were at the beginnings of their careers when this huge compression occurred.

Indeed, I started my company in 2002, and in that job-scarce, talent-rich environment, I found that I could easily staff my company with contractors who had ample experience and worked for ‘very’ reasonable rates.

I had left my previous job six weeks after 9/11, determined to spend my days doing work I loved with people I liked. The revolving door of young Gen X colleagues, coupled with an exploding economy and then the reality of the contracting business environment in 2000 and 2001, had left me disenchanted. Most of my time was spent either trying to keep butts in seats on the upswing or get them out in the downturn, all without losing any revenue. In my own company, I could control who worked for me and who we worked for.

So, my business partner and I decided we wanted to avoid working with the young, demanding Gen Xers who represented most of our management issues over the previous four years, and we only hired people with at least ten years of experience, which took us out of the majority of the Gen X talent pool in 2002.

And, of course, the financial collapse of 2008 and the ensuing Great Recession happened right as Gen Xers were finding their career strides and dramatic earning potentials again and as Boomers by the hundreds of thousands were planning to retire. More than 8.8 million Boomers and Gen Xers lost their jobs between 2008 and 2010. And the last seven years have represented a struggling, irregular rebuilding of the economy as millions of older Boomers have been hanging onto their jobs as long as possible to rebuild their retirement savings, Gen Xers are hitting middle age, and Millennials are entering the job market like a tsunami.

And here’s the rub: Millennials have flooded into the workplace in the millions since 2010, moving into a challenging economy where far older colleagues are wanting to claw back their retirement funds. But the Millennials don’t seem to stick at the jobs they’ve landed. While the reality of the Great Recession remains a significant dynamic for Boomers, who now face increased difficulty finding and keeping work and/or saving for their retirements, as well as for many Gen Xers, the oldest of whom have just entered their fifties, Millennials seem to be job-hopping. This is the case even when 36 percent of working Millennials live at home and 71 percent of students graduating from four-year colleges have significant debt. The average debt is rising for public, private, and for-profit colleges, where the average debt at graduation is $25,500, $32,300, and $39,950, respectively.

Margo, CEO of a mid-sized advertising firm, shares her exasperation: “It is so frustrating to have worked so hard to keep my company not just alive but actually growing in the last five years and have Millennials just walk out the door when they don’t like what it is to work. What did they think work was supposed to be?” This is a sentiment I heard over and over again in my interviews with executives across the country.

The generational difference in attitudes toward work can be stark, and it creates frustration, at the least, and resentment and distrust, at the worst, from people who have been through the economy-driven career wringer.

Not that it’s been easy for all Millennials to find work. The oldest set of Millennials—those born between 1980 and 1987—have, for the most part, been able to find jobs. The middle group, the largest cohort of Millennials, is where the real pain point in this generation lies. Millions of these Gen Yers, born between 1988 and 1996, have had a stunted start to their careers given the fallout of the Great Recession, and they are still trying to catch up to where they “should be” based on their education. Job-hopping for this group seems antithetical to their experience to most Boomers, Gen Xers, and older Millennials, and the perception is that Millennials aren’t loyal to their employers, despite how challenging it has been to find work. Yet, here we are.”


FROM THE BOOK JACKET: 

It is rare today for employees to stay with one organization for the long tenures that were the norm before the Great Recession. In fact, “job hopping” is the new norm, especially for Millennials. In The Boomerang Principle, companies learn how to leverage this fact rather than fear it. By engendering a lifetime of loyalty from former employees, leaders can see them “return” in the form of customers, partners, clients, advocates, contractors, and even returning employees.

Author Lee Caraher has built several companies and managed many Millennials along the way. In her first book, Millennials & Management, she shared her wisdom on how to get an intergenerational workforce to contribute to the larger goals of the organization. In this follow-up book, she shifts the emphasis to creating valuable, long-lasting relationships with your employees to ensure they remain your biggest fans, even if they leave the company.

The Boomerang Principle is a pragmatic answer to the outdated corporate mindset around employee turnover. Instead, it shifts the focus to creating lifetime loyalty from your alumni who will bring back business again and again.


ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Lee McEnany Caraher is the founder and CEO of Double Forte, a national public relations and digital media agency, based in San Francisco, that works with beloved consumer, technology, and wine brands. A sought-after communication strategist, Lee is known for her practical solutions to big problems. Her first book, Millennials & Management: The Essential Guide to Making It Work at Work, was informed by her work helping organizations around the country create positive intergenerational workplaces.

Lee is active in her community, and sits on the board of directors or trustees of KQED Public Media, San Francisco’s Grace Cathedral, and Menlo College. A graduate of Carleton College, Lee has a degree in medieval history which she finds useful every day. She lives on the San Francisco Peninsula with her husband, their sons, and Al, their blind cat.


This week’s selection ‘THE BOOMERANG PRINCIPLE’ by Lee Caraher appears Monday thru Friday and comes to you courtesy of dearreader.com and BurlingtonPublicLibrary.ca Business Online Book Club.

Buy the Book

 

‘THE BOOMERANG PRINCIPLE: Inspiring Lifetime Loyalty…’

‘… From Your Employees’ part three

by Lee Caraher
Published by Bibliomotion, Inc.
ISBN: 9781629561684
eBook ISBN: 9781351816571
Copyright (c) 2017 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

Buy the Book

“At the same time, the rise of the contract economy—with the success of companies such as Uber, Lyft, Upwork, Fivvr, Care.com, Varsity Tutors, TaskRabbit, and so many others that offer Internet platforms that match independent contractors with specific skills to the companies and solopreneurs that need them—brings an entirely new dynamic to people’s professional expectations and opportunities and to companies’ searches for reliable and consistent talent to deliver on their business. We are in the early days of a dramatic talent and service market shift, yet I predict that those platform companies that engender loyalty from their talent pool rather than their users will be the most successful in the long term.

I’ve never met an Uber driver who wasn’t also a Lyft driver, and I’ve found the same graphic designers on Upwork as on Fivrr—no individual will rely on one platform to help him bring home the bacon. Businesses that can create marketplace demand for a particular service while honoring the actual provider will ultimately be those to which the talent pool is loyal. And without the personal connection or contract implicit in actual employment, loyalty will be predicated almost entirely on the platform company’s ability to deliver.

Where does all of this leave us?

Boomerangs—people who remain loyal to companies, not just people, after they leave—are now important drivers of sustainable business models for organizations for all sizes. Companies need to shift their philosophies, business practices, and mind-sets to embrace and leverage the fact that Americans increasingly understand that they will have to create their own careers and retirements; therefore, companies will only flourish when they engender and earn loyalty in their employee or talent bases so that when (not if) they leave, employees or contractors will Boomerang back as customers, referrers, advocates, or employees for their lifetimes.

Boomerangs are the drivers of sustainable business.

In addition to drawing on my own experience, I draw on interviews with more than one hundred business leaders—people who’ve returned to former employers (as well as those who wouldn’t consider it—and surveys with more than five thousand participants to share collective learning on creating a constructive work alumni group that may include boomerang talent. In the following chapters, I share how to put the Boomerang Principle to work for your business or team. Loyalty is not dead! The loyalty contract has changed, however, and when we embrace our new reality, we can dramatically improve our workdays, careers, and bottom lines.

CHAPTER 1

The New Loyalty Paradigm

“No one’s loyal anymore; why should I invest one minute in these people? They’re all going to leave soon anyway.” So began my conversation with a general manager of a Boston-based medium-sized technology firm; I’d asked, “What’s your biggest pain point right now?” And his response is a variation on a theme I’ve heard over the past five years in my work as the CEO of my own company, board member for a variety of nonprofit organizations, member of Entrepreneurs’ Organization, and keynote speaker on creating positive intergenerational workforces. Boomer bosses, in particular, seem to have a difficult time with the reality that their younger colleagues, especially Millennials, don’t plan to stay in one company for a very long time. Or at least their perception is that Millennials won’t stick.

Loyalty—the quality or state of having a strong feeling of support or allegiance to a company or organization—has long been equated with the tenure of an employee. No more. In today’s world, where people expect to chart their own meaningful careers independent of a set time at any one entity, we need to shift our definition of loyalty to a company from a long tenure to a lifetime of allegiance regardless of employment status.

What businesses small, medium, and large need today is a proportional growing army of former employees who remain advocates, consumers, and friends of our companies. This is the future of the thriving workplace: Successful companies will inspire valuable alumni who ensure their businesses’ relevance and vitality. We need boomerang employees who come back to our companies as consumers, referrals, partners, clients, contractors, and, yes, employees for a second or third tour of duty.

The Boomerang Principle: the belief that organizations that allow and encourage former employees to return have a strategic advantage over those that don’t.

Those companies that shift now for the long game of allegiance will have a strategic advantage over those that don’t. Why? First, because this mind-set, and the actions, policies, and cultures that derive from it, actually keep good employees in companies longer than they had planned, which in turn drives efficiency and profit. Second, returning employees become fully functional and utilized exponentially faster than new employees. Third, the larger your allegiant footprint, the more sustainable your business will be.

Millennials: Job-Hoppers?

“Why are Millennials such job-hoppers?” This question has been almost universal in my work coming out of ‘Millennials & Management: The Essential Guide to Making It Work at Work’, the book I wrote out of my experience recovering from what I called my company’s epic failure to retain Millennials. More than 150 interviews and 50 speeches and workshops later, I can tell you that the lament of “no one’s loyal anymore” is an important, and damaging, narrative— or background music—in companies of all sizes across the country today. Search ‘job-hoppers’ or ‘job loyalty’, and you could spend hours just paging through the results, most of which are laden with negativity.”


FROM THE BOOK JACKET:

It is rare today for employees to stay with one organization for the long tenures that were the norm before the Great Recession. In fact, “job hopping” is the new norm, especially for Millennials. In The Boomerang Principle, companies learn how to leverage this fact rather than fear it. By engendering a lifetime of loyalty from former employees, leaders can see them “return” in the form of customers, partners, clients, advocates, contractors, and even returning employees.

Author Lee Caraher has built several companies and managed many Millennials along the way. In her first book, Millennials & Management, she shared her wisdom on how to get an intergenerational workforce to contribute to the larger goals of the organization. In this follow-up book, she shifts the emphasis to creating valuable, long-lasting relationships with your employees to ensure they remain your biggest fans, even if they leave the company.

The Boomerang Principle is a pragmatic answer to the outdated corporate mindset around employee turnover. Instead, it shifts the focus to creating lifetime loyalty from your alumni who will bring back business again and again.


ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Lee McEnany Caraher is the founder and CEO of Double Forte, a national public relations and digital media agency, based in San Francisco, that works with beloved consumer, technology, and wine brands. A sought-after communication strategist, Lee is known for her practical solutions to big problems. Her first book, Millennials & Management: The Essential Guide to Making It Work at Work, was informed by her work helping organizations around the country create positive intergenerational workplaces.

Lee is active in her community, and sits on the board of directors or trustees of KQED Public Media, San Francisco’s Grace Cathedral, and Menlo College. A graduate of Carleton College, Lee has a degree in medieval history which she finds useful every day. She lives on the San Francisco Peninsula with her husband, their sons, and Al, their blind cat.

This week’s selection ‘THE BOOMERANG PRINCIPLE’ by Lee Caraher appears Monday thru Friday and comes to you courtesy of dearreader.com and BurlingtonPublicLibrary.ca Business Online Book Club.

Buy the Book

 

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